India

Round Table on the Indian Parliament Debates: A People’s Perspective


A roundtable of discussion was held at the India International Centre, New Delhi on the 18th of July 2012. The roundtable began with an overview of SAHR’s vision as envisioned by founder members Kuldip Nayar and I. K Gujral. The idea that gave birth to the Parliament Watch programme in India – that is, the necessity to critically evaluate bills and debates presented in Parliament together with the engagement of individuals, organisations and  groups that have been working on or speaking on behalf of issues regarding policy level changes – was discussed.  Four bills, that is, Land Acquisition, Rehabilitation and Resettlement Bill 2011, Protection of Children Against sexual Offences Bill 2011, The National Food Security Bill 2011 and an analysis of the budget 2012 were focused on at the discussion. A full report on the roundtable can be accessed here.

Parliament Watch India: March-May 2012 Report


The Indian Parliament has been in operation for the past 60 years, a matter of pride for some, indifference for a few others who had imagined independent India to be somewhat different. Human rights in India have not been given the kind of attention and recognition that it needs. According to Amnesty International’s The State of the World’s Human Rights Report 2012, “India has not done enough to protect human rights either at home or globally.” In that context, it is important to look at the status and get an update of various issues that have been taken up by the Indian parliament. The budget session of the Indian Parliament began on March 12, 2012 and ended on May 22, 2012.

The Lokpal and Lokayuktas Bill 2011 was passed by the Lok Sabha during the winter session in 2011 but it could not be passed in the Rajya Sabha at that point.

For more of the report, click here

Parliament Watch India – August-December 2011 Report


The Indian subcontinent has seen some interesting developments in the past few months. Freedom of expression is inherent to a democratic set up and this has been reflected in different ways in the case of India. It is a matter of appreciation that certain significant bills have finally been introduced for consultation at the parliament. These are new legislations which are certainly required. However, for some of them, there have been several levels of opposition, many points of dissent which have to be looked at and brought to notice.

The monsoon session1 of the Indian Parliament began on August 1, 2011 and ended on September 8, 2011. There were 83 government bills pending before the session and 14 bills were introduced during the session. 11 bills were passed during the session and 86 bills were pending after it.

For more of the report, click here

Parliament Watch India – March-May 2012 Report


The Indian Parliament has been in operation for the past 60 years, a matter of pride for some, indifference for a few others who had imagined independent India to be somewhat different. Human rights in India have not been given the kind of attention and recognition that it needs. According to Amnesty International’s The State of the World’s Human Rights Report 2012, “India has not done enough to protect human rights either at home or globally.” In that context, it is important to look at the status and get an update of various issues that have been taken up by the Indian parliament. The budget session of the Indian Parliament began on March 12, 2012 and ended on May 22, 2012.

The Lokpal and Lokayuktas Bill 2011 was passed by the Lok Sabha during the winter session in 2011 but it could not be passed in the Rajya Sabha at that point.

For more of the report, click here

Parliament Watch India – August-December 2011 Report


The Indian subcontinent has seen some interesting developments in the past few months. Freedom of expression is inherent to a democratic set up and this has been reflected in different ways in the case of India. It is a matter of appreciation that certain significant bills have finally been introduced for consultation at the parliament. These are new legislations which are certainly required. However, for some of them, there have been several levels of opposition, many points of dissent which have to be looked at and brought to notice.

The monsoon session of the Indian Parliament began on August 1, 2011 and ended on September 8, 2011. There were 83 government bills pending before the session and 14 bills were introduced during the session. 11 bills were passed during the session and 86 bills were pending after it.

For more of the report, click here

India: Domestic helps left out of sexual harassment Bill Read more: Domestic helps left out of sexual harassment Bill


NEW DELHI: The government has excluded domestic helps — among the sections most vulnerable to sexual harassment — from the purview of the Bill that the Union Cabinet cleared here on Thursday for protection of women against sexual harassment at workplace.

The Bill, which is likely to be tabled in the winter session of Parliament, mandates that women subjected to sexual advances — verbal or physical — are within their right to complain against her colleague. A person found guilty of sexual harassment is likely to face financial penalties besides loss of employment and, in case of a graver offence — a police complaint.

In order to address complaints related to sexual harassment, the Bill envisages formation of committees in each organisation, which has more than 10 workers or a local committee at the level of district or sub-district if it is an organisation with less than 10 people.

(more…)

CLRA Policy Briefings for Parliamentarians


The Human Impact of Climate Change in India


Civil Liability for Nuclear Damage Bill 2010


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